Learning Road Trip

A series of visits to people whose work you want to learn more about or, by their responses to you presenting your own work, learn from. Although, in the academic world, budgets and schedules for hosting visitors are limited, people are often happy to carve out time and arrange an audience for a self-funding visitor, especially one who wants to learn more about their work. You do not have to be on their “A-list” to be welcome. Airbnb or economy motels and driving your own car can keep costs down. To reduce the strain of driving long distances, team up with someone with whom you can have a rolling in-car seminar on what you are learning and other shared interests. Read more of this post

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Novels with a “capacity to make me uncomfortable, to unnerve or challenge or confuse me”

Last week, during the day when I should’ve been working and in the wee hours when I was sleepless due to jet lag persisting after my return from a month in Australia, I feasted on Plum Rains and then The Spanish Bow by Andromeda Romano-Lax. I’m now suffering withdrawal–having read Detour and Behave a year or so ago, I have no more of her novels to look ahead to. Anyway, let me use this blog post to convey a few notes of appreciation.
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Taking Yourself Seriously: New edition is taking shape

Taking Yourself Seriously: New edition is taking shape. New section and corresponding tools on:
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Helping make sense of inevitable changes over the life course

“If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans”—Not!

This discussion board invites participants to contribute
a) examples of advice about how to make sense of inevitable changes over the life course and/or
b) reflect on whether that advice could apply to them and what the implications would be.

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Democratically elected presidents?

Commentators on the 100th birthday of Nelson Mandela describe him as the first democratically elected president of South Africa. Presumably, all the elections, governments, politics, and presidents that South Africa had before majority rule did not count as democratic because distinct proportions of the population were disenfranchised. When, Americans should then ask, was the first democratically elected president of their nation? After the 15th amendment in 1870, the 19th in 1920, or the civil rights act of 1964? In any case, with Republican voter restrictions and gerrymandering sanctioned by the Supreme court, when, Americans might also ask, will U.S. again have democratically elected presidents?
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Create Change Co-Coaching (draft publicity material for comments)

Create Change Co-Coaching
(a project of the The Pumping Station)
Participate with 6-8 others in a Studio for a year to become certified as a Co-Coach.
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Expanding teaching to match my intellectual framework

Intersecting Processes

I’m rethinking an earlier post I noted that my teaching emphasizes only two of the five items that I consider to be linked together in my intellectual framework.

I’m often introducing alternatives, but not so often drawing students into building the constituency to support what is implied by the alternative. I put the alternative out there as if I’m saying it’s good and interesting, now you explore it—it’s up to you—just think about it.

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