To meta-MOOC or not?

I think I’d have reservations if someone came to my regular college course saying that they didn’t want to attend all the lectures and do most of the assignments, but, instead, wanted to have discussions with students about how to rework the classes, study the diverse learning strategies of other students, make connections with competing theories of epistemology, etc.

But this kind of discussion often emerges in a connectivist-MOOC so the question might be just how much metaMOOCing can take place in a c-MOOC before it undermines the core purpose of the course?

This question has extra relevance in a MOOC on learning creative learning, where the central ideas are that Playing with materials as part of a Project, undertaken with Peer interaction is a way to release the Passion that learning ought to be about.  It would be a metaProject to have the LCL MOOC be a project for many people, not only the LifeLong Kindergarten core group.

If you buy my earlier post that there might be a 5th P — Parameters — then metaProjects might be out of bounds.  But it would be interesting — if not this year when the LLK are doing a first run with their new videos and format, then perhaps next year — for a c-MOOC on Learning Creative Learning to encourage metaProjects.  Thoughts?

Originally posted to http://discuss-learn.media.mit.edu/t/to-metamooc-or-not/850

Relevant posts that fed into this one include:

http://discuss-learn.media.mit.edu/t/a-fifth-p-parameters/548

http://discuss-learn.media.mit.edu/t/lets-make-the-live-seminars-amazing-ideas-please/721

http://discuss-learn.media.mit.edu/t/think-listen-share-on-our-learning-process-in-the-lcl2-mooc/177

http://discuss-learn.media.mit.edu/t/what-are-the-non-negotiables-of-creative-learning/826

http://discuss-learn.media.mit.edu/t/when-to-step-away-from-technology/398

 

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About Peter J. Taylor
Peter Taylor is a Professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he teaches and directs undergraduate and graduate programs on critical thinking, reflective practice, and science-in-society. His research and writing focuses on the complexity of environmental and health sciences in their social context, incl. Unruly Complexity: Ecology, Interpretation, Engagement (U. Chicago Press, 2005) and Nature-nurture? No (2014, http://bit.ly/NNN2014). On reflective practice, see Taking Yourself Seriously: Processes of Research & Engagement (with J. Szteiter, 2012, http://bit.ly/TYS2012).

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