A project-based learning experiment in feminist pedagogy

This post documents a conference presentation on project-based learning (PBL) as implemented in a course on gender, race, and science, co-taught four times for the Boston-area Graduate Consortium on Women’s Studies. Evaluations of the course document a tension between initial discomfort and subsequent appreciation: “you might think you aren’t sufficiently grounded by the course [but] being on the other side of it now, I see it works out beautifully.” (read more…)

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Online platforms: Learning as one goes vs. polished & stable appearance

Recently I posted the following on a course blog (which is a new feature I’m experimenting with this semester):

You will notice that the appearance of the blog has changed and might wonder: Why didn’t the instructors get feedback before going live so the appearance of the online materials could be polished and then stable once the course started?–After all, there are enough “rooms” to explore in the “house” of the online materials without risking having any student feeling that they were in a different house from the one they entered the day before.
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Vertical/unity and Horizontal/change: New prospectus and bio

Continuing a series of posts on the development of the Collaborative for Exploration of Scientific and Political Change within the framework of Ben Schwendener’s Seminar on Creativity.

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10 June 2011
New prospectus and bio

The Collaborative for Exploration of Scientific and Political Change seeks to support inquiries, teaching-learning interactions, and other practices of critical intellectual exchange and cooperation that challenge the barriers of expertise, gender, race, class, and place that normally restrict access to, understanding of, and influence on the production of scientific knowledge and technologies.
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Uses of wikis: More and less than expected

Before reviewing a variety of ways one might use wikis—only the last of which is the much-vaunted “collaborative knowledge generation”—let us consider the general kinds of reasons for using a technological tool. (This post comes from a wikipage with links that I created in order to give a talk on the Uses of Wikis at an educational technology conference in May 2010. The post, like the wikipage, requires clicking on the links and viewing the examples in relation to key terms in the bullet points below the links.)
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