Modes of creative learning in microworlds, messyworlds, and the real world, cont.

This schema uses the distinction in the title (and previous post) in two directions.  It needs to be filled in with more examples, especially ones that are off the diagonal.

Modes of creative learning are shaped first by what things are taken as given and thereby constrain the creations–materials provide a check: Does it work? (as +Natalie Rusk pointed out to me).  One challenge is to have the social worlds check, in an analogous way, those forms of learning that are not so materially based (e.g., learning about how different communities prepare for extreme climatic events).

My intuition is that the modes of creative learning are not only specific to the sector, but also arise from helping people to move to new sectors.  For example, workshops that create spaces for “connecting, probing, and reflecting” (CPR spaces) might help participants to not simply continue along previous lines (http://wp.me/p1gwfa-uJ).

Worlds3x3e

References

Chiapasgames
Collaborative explorations

Computer Clubs

CPR Spaces

Products from Lucas Aerospace plan

Makey makey

Northstar school, MA, USA

Project-Based Learning

Scratch

Turtle

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About Peter J. Taylor
Peter Taylor is a Professor at the University of Massachusetts Boston where he teaches and directs undergraduate and graduate programs on critical thinking, reflective practice, and science-in-society. His research and writing focuses on the complexity of environmental and health sciences in their social context, incl. Unruly Complexity: Ecology, Interpretation, Engagement (U. Chicago Press, 2005) and Nature-nurture? No (2014, http://bit.ly/NNN2014). On reflective practice, see Taking Yourself Seriously: Processes of Research & Engagement (with J. Szteiter, 2012, http://bit.ly/TYS2012).

One Response to Modes of creative learning in microworlds, messyworlds, and the real world, cont.

  1. Pingback: Modes of creative learning in microworlds, messyworlds, and the real world, III | Probe—Create Change—Reflect

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