Teaching Critical Thinking in Age of Digital Credulity

Howard Rheingold wants to address how to “impart to young people the always useful but now essential skills of how to question, investigate, analyze and judge that link they just got in email or the factual claim they just found through a search engine.”  In his video interview with me, I emphasize the “challenge of… get[ting] students to take themselves seriously — not to perform according to some standards of mastery of content, but to identify projects that are really important to them to advance in the program and to continue afterward.”

On methods: The need for dialogue and reflective practice

The conventional status hierarchy for methods of research could (should?) be inverted.

It is conventional for social science and education doctoral programs to include courses on quantitative methods (statistics and perhaps survey and experimental design).  Sometimes such courses are supplemented by qualitative methods.  Action Research may be mentioned, but the value given to the products of Action Research is lower to the extent that there are multiple authors, including non-academics, and distributed in non-academic venues (e.g., reports, meetings).  Moreover, tools and processes for dialogue, collaboration, and reflective practice are rarely if ever included in methods courses.  After all, how are they related to evidence-based practice?  Let us consider where this status hierarchy gets us. Read more of this post

A reflection template based on Parker Palmer’s “There is a season”

Use this reflection template whenever you are ready to pause and take stock before proceeding either: from one phase to another; on from an activity or event; into dialogue with others; or at a branch point when choosing an activity or path to pursue. Copy the template page or print it out, then for each of the items, note “plus-delta”—one thing you did well during the phase/activity/event and one thing that could be developed further next time.http://ptaylor.wikispaces.umb.edu/PalmerSeasons

Reference: Palmer, P. J. (2000). “There is a season,” p. 95-109 in Let Your Life Speak: Listening for the Voice of Vocation. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass.

Extending Play: “Stuck busters”

This design sketch builds on the 4P’s of the Lifelong Kindergarten (LLK) — Projects, Passion, Peers, Play (see http://learn.media.mit.edu/).  It is a response to the case for the 2nd topic, Play, of the July 2014 Design for Living Complexities course. Read more of this post

Moving and motivating given the gaps

My pulling-together-the-pieces form of curiosity  together with asking about what motivate curiosity, in what directions, and how far led me to explore a schema from past work about “gaps.”  Rather than wait till I had time to write and revise the ideas, I speak about them in this 18-minute video podcast,
http://youtu.be/TLHEVguyW_Q.

Creativity, curiosity, reflection within a frame of “engaging with distributed complexity”

My pulling-together-the-pieces form of curiosity  led me to assemble schemas from past work and try to integrate them in a coherent account.  Rather than wait till I had time to write and revise the ideas, I speak about them in this 34-minute video podcast:
http://youtu.be/wMAEy7ZYR9w

What to think about curiosity killing the cat?

“Curiosity kills the cat.” That doesn’t imply don’t be curious. What it implies is curiosity has consequences. It takes you out of safe areas.

What are the guidelines we need for being curious? Read more of this post

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